16 Minerals Your Body Should Have to Function At It’s Best

Essential minerals for the body.

The Need To Know?

Being clearly informed about the minerals you need to take so that your immune system is able to function at its full potential is extremely important.

This comprehensive list will inform you about which minerals your body needs to attain and sustain a powerful Immune system and fantastic overall health.

You will also learn about what each mineral does, which minerals your body produces naturally and which of them  you may need to supplement , along with examples of associated risk.

You will also discover a wide range of the best food sources you can easily begin to incorporate into you and your family’s daily diet.

  • Calcium (Ca)

What it Does

This particular mineral goes about building and protecting bones and teeth, it assists with muscle contractions and relaxation, blood clotting, and nerve impulse transmission.

Calcium, plays a role in hormone secretion and enzyme activation, it also assists in sustaining and maintaining healthy blood pressure.

Best Food Source

There are lots of varieties available nowadays, including yogurts, cheese, milk, tofu, sardines, salmon, fortified juices.

Leafy green vegetables, such as broccoli and kale are fantastic sources, but not spinach or Swiss chard, which have binders that lessen absorption.

Associated Risks

Adults absorb roughly 30% of calcium ingested, but this can vary depending on the source, diets very high in calcium may increase the risk of prostate cancer.

  • Chloride (Cl)

What it does

Chloride, is a component of stomach acid and balances fluids in the body, it is essential for digestion.

Best Food Source

Salt (sodium chloride), soy sauce and processed foods.

Minerals are just as important as vitamins.
A good variety of different foods ensure you get the right amounts of both minerals & vitamins.
  • Chromium (Cr)

What it Does

Chromium enhances the activity of insulin helps maintain normal blood glucose levels and is needed to free energy from glucose.

Best Food Source

Meat, poultry, fish, eggs, potatoes, some cereals, nuts, cheese also unrefined foods such as brewer’s yeast, nuts, and cheeses all are the great sources of chromium.

Associated Risk

Brewer’s yeast can sometimes cause bloating and nausea, so you may choose to get chromium from other food sources.

  • Copper (Cu)

What it Does

Copper plays an important role in iron metabolism and immune system health, it also helps make red blood cells.

Best Food Source

Liver, shellfish, nuts, seeds, whole-grain products, beans, prunes, cocoa and black pepper, more than half of the copper in foods is absorbed.

  • Fluoride (F)

What it Does

Fluoride, encourages strong bone formation and helps to keep dental cavities from starting or worsening.

Best Food Source

Water that is fluoridated, toothpaste with fluoride, marine fish and some teas.

Associated Risk

*Extremely harmful to children in excessive amounts.

  • Iron (Fe) 

What it Does  

Iron (Fe) is a mineral needed for hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen, it is also needed for energy, good muscle and organ function.

Needed for chemical reactions in the body it is also used to make amino acids, collagen, neurotransmitters, and hormones.

Best Food Source

Red meat, poultry, eggs, fruits, green vegetables, fortified bread and grain products.

Associated Risks

Can cause constipation, because iron is harder to absorb from plants, experts suggest vegetarians get twice the recommended amount (assuming the source is food).

What minerals do I need to take.
A balanced nutritious diet will ensure that you are getting all the essential minerals you need.
  • Magnesium (Ma)

What it Does

Magnesium, needed for many chemical reactions in the body and works with calcium in muscle contraction, blood clotting, and regulation of blood pressure also helps build bones and teeth.

Best Food Source

Green vegetables such as spinach and broccoli, legumes, cashews, sunflower seeds and other seeds, halibut, whole-wheat bread and milk.

Associated Risk

The majority of magnesium in the body is found in your bones, if your blood levels are low your body may tap into these reserves to correct the problem.

  • Manganese (Mn)

What it Does

Manganese, helps form bones and metabolize amino acids, cholesterol, and carbohydrates.

Best Food Source

Fish, nuts, legumes, whole grains and tea.

Associated Risks

If you take supplements or have manganese in your drinking water, be careful not to exceed the upper limit and those with liver damage or whose diets supply abundant manganese should be especially vigilant.

  • Molybdenum (Mo)

What it Does

Molybdenum, makes up part of several enzymes, one of which helps ward off a form of severe neurological damage in infants that can lead to early death.

Best Food Source

Legumes, nuts, grain products and milk, Molybdenum deficiencies are quite rare.

  • Phosphorus (P)

What it Does

An extremely important mineral, phosphorous, is essential for DNA and RNA function and development as both these genetic molecules have a sugar-phosphate backbone.

The phosphate works as a kind of “super glue,” since it has three oxygen atoms that will carry charges in solution.

Helping in the conversion of food into energym it is one of the major elements of phospholipids which carry lipids in blood and help shuttle nutrients into and out of cells.

Best Food Source

A wide variety of foods, are available that contains this important mineral including milk and dairy products, meat, fish, poultry, eggs, liver, green peas, broccoli, potatoes and almonds.

Associated Risks

Certain drugs bind with phosphorus making it unavailable and causing bone loss, weakness, and pain.

Vitamin and minerals for a healthy Immune System.
An apple a day really can help keep the doctor away.
  • Potassium (K)

What it Does

Potassium helps to balance fluids in the body it also helps in maintaining a steady heartbeat and sends nerve impulses needed for muscle contractions.

A diet rich in potassium seems to lower blood pressure, getting enough potassium from your diet also benefits bones.

Best Food Source

Found in meat, milk, fruits, vegetables, grains and legumes.

Associated Risks

Food sources do not cause toxicity, but high-dose supplements might.

  • Selenium (Se)

What it Does

Selenium acts as an antioxidant neutralizing unstable molecules that can damage cells and helps regulate thyroid hormone activity.

Best Food Source

This mineral can be found in organ meats such as liver and kidneys, seafood, walnuts, grain products and sometimes plants (depends on soil content).

News Flash!

Researchers are investigating whether selenium may help reduce the risk of developing cancer, but with mixed results.

  • Sodium (Na)

What it Does

Sodium balances fluids in the body and helps send nerve impulses needed for muscle contractions.

It also has an impact on blood pressure, its worth noting that even modest reductions in salt consumption can lower blood pressure.

Best Food Source

Salt, soy sauce, processed foods and most vegetables.

Associated Risk

While experts recommend that people limit sodium intake to 2,300 mg most Americans consume 4,000–6,000 mg a day.

  • Sulfur (S)

Sulfur, Iodine and Zinc are all essential items in Mother Natures makeup bag
Mother Nature has already provided you with the best beauty treatments you could ever need.

What it Does

Sulfur is a constituent of the two B vitamins Biotin and Thiamine and is needed by the body for the synthesis of a number of sulfur-containing compounds.

These include chondroitin sulfate a mucopolysaccharide found in cartilage, hormone insulin and the anticoagulant heparin.

As part of the amino acid cysteine, it may also have a role in the transport of amino acids across cell membranes.

Sulfur is also essential for healthy skin, hair and nails.

Best Food Source

Protein-rich foods contain sulfur such as meats, fish, poultry, nuts, and legumes.

Associated Risks

There is no recommended amount for sulfur and deficiencies usually occur only with a severe lack of protein in your diet.

  • Iodine (I)

What it Does

The thyroid gland coverts the iodine contained in your food and converts it into the thyroid hormones, T4 (thyroxine) and T3 (triiodothyronine) which helps set body temperature.

Assists in the prevention of goiter and a congenital thyroid dis-order, thyroid cells are the only cells in your body that are able to absorb iodine and influences nerve and muscle function, reproduction and growth.

Best Food Source

Most sea food and processed foods contain iodine and to prevent iodine deficiencies, some countries add iodine to salt, bread, or drinking water.

  • Zinc (Zn)

What it Does

Helps form many enzymes and proteins, creating new cells and frees Vitamin A from storage in the liver.

Zinc is a major player in immune system health along with taste, smell, and wound healing and when taken with certain antioxidants, zinc may also delay the progression of age-related muscular degeneration.

As an essential trace element Zinc is required for normal cell growth and development it is involved in DNA synthesis, RNA transcription, and cell division and activation.

It is also a critical component in many zinc protein/ enzymes, including critical zinc transcription factors.

Best Food Source

Red meats, poultry, oysters and some seafood, fortified cereals, beans and nuts.

Associated Risks

Zinc deficiency along with altered metabolism is observed in many types of liver disease, including alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and viral liver disease.

Vegetarians, need to be aware that they will absorb less zinc because of their diet, experts suggest that they get twice the recommended requirement of zinc from plant foods.

As always all contribution to the discussion are always encouraged and always very much appreciated.

Stay Save, Stay Healthy, Stay Strong

About Mitch Always Promoting Good Health

Mitch X:-).

*Please note the information contained in this post is intended for the purpose of general information and should not be used as a substitute for the individual expertise and judgement of healthcare professionals.

 

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